Keeping The Water Flowing

Dirtworks Keeps the Water Flowing at Minnesota Hospital

Keeping the Water Flowing

After a Watermain Break

Minnesota contractor Dirtworks Inc. is doing their part to serve their community. Vice President Steve Strandlund recently shared how the team worked 24 hours straight to get their local hospital back up and running after a watermain break.

"Want to know what's so unique about the construction industry? The people. Some days, we get calls in the middle of the day that require employees to work 24 hours straight to help fix critical things such as a broken water main. Two days ago, that water main was at our local hospital... There's plenty of chaos out there right now and more than ever we are proud to have one heck of a team of people that pulls together to serve our customers and our local community. And at the end of the day, that makes it all worth it.


Hats off to all of the good people in the world, in any industry, doing their part to keep the world turning without caring if they are in the spotlight or getting the credit."

Dirtworks operator Brandon Points
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Dirtworks operator Brandon Points operating a 323 at the hospital.

Nate's first 12-hour shift fixing the watermain
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After Nate Bostrom’s first 12-hour shift fixing the watermain, he went home, only to be called back for another 12-hour shift.

Dan Laase and Cole Rockstad working on the emergency repair
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Dan Laase and Cole Rockstad were also part of the crew working to keep water flowing at the hospital.

Dirtworks operator Brandon Points
Nate's first 12-hour shift fixing the watermain
Dan Laase and Cole Rockstad working on the emergency repair

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