Skid Steer with Snow Blower: Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices
Skid Steer with Snow Blower: Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices

Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices

Residential and commercial snow removal jobs have their differences, and with these simple best practices, you can keep your job sites running smoothly no matter where you work.

Ready for job site success this winter storm season?  With these residential and commercial snow removal best practices, you can help your business thrive.

Skid Steer with Snow Blower: Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices
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Skid Steer with Snow Blower: Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices

Have a Defined Snow Removal Work Agreement

This is a must when it comes to both residential and commercial snow removal jobs. You want to be clear about what services you will and won’t be performing for your customers so that there is no confusion once the work is done. Residential jobs are typically shorter-term, while commercial snow removal contracts usually involve a longer period of time in which you’ll be expected to remove snow. Commercial jobs often require that you leave machines on-site during the contract period and may require you to remove snow immediately if you’re working for something like a hospital. Defining these factors before you start working will help you ensure there are no surprises on the job.

Get the Right Work Insurance Coverage

Insurance coverage varies by state, by type of work being performed, and by whether you’re working on a residential or commercial property. Before you begin working, it’s a good idea to reach out to your insurance agent to make sure you’re covered correctly so that you won’t run into any issues based on the work you’re doing.

For commercial snow removal jobs, it’s also a good idea to take photos of the job site before snow falls in order to document the state of the property so you won’t be liable for any existing damage later on.

Know Your State and Local Snow Removal Regulations

Snow and ice removal regulations are different from state to state, and local governments and municipalities often have their own rules and regulations too. In big cities, for example, snow usually can’t be piled on the street and must be cleared away by truck or melter. And when it comes to residential work specifically, you should also be aware of homeowners association regulations on snow clearing, especially if you’re contracted to work through the homeowners association itself.

Have the Proper Snow Removal Equipment for the Job

For residential snow removal, machines like skid steer loaders and compact track loaders, along with snow plows and pushes, work best since their compact size allows you to clear things like driveways more easily. 

For commercial snow removal jobs, skid steer loaders are still used, with the addition of compact wheel loaders and small wheel loaders with a snow plow or push for clearing larger areas like parking lots. 

Whether you’re doing residential snow removal or work on commercial sites, your local Cat® dealer can recommend the best equipment for the job.

The Attachments You Need

Learn more about what to look for when shopping for snow removal attachments.

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On The Level: Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices
On The Level: Residential vs. Commercial Snow Removal Best Practices

Check Your Snow Removal Equipment Regularly

Along with having the right tools for the job at hand, it’s important for any type of snow removal to regularly check your equipment, including things like cutting edges and teeth, for any wear and tear and to see what parts need replacing before the next big snow season.

No matter the type of snow removal you do, with these tips, you can keep your job sites running smoothly all winter long.